Gerald M. Masson Distinguished Lecture Series

Gerald M. Masson

In 2016, the Department of Computer Science recognized Masson’s visionary leadership with a series of special events marking 30 years of computing at Johns Hopkins. That celebration included the establishment of the Gerald M. Masson Distinguished Lecture Series, which each year brings computer science researchers to the Homewood campus to talk about important topics in the field.

To learn more about Gerald Masson, click here.

To download this year’s flier, click here.

 

 

  • Vijay Kumar
    University of Pennsylvania
    Title: Opportunities and Challenges in Autonomy for Small Aerial Vehicles
    Date: September 25, 2018
    Abstract:The last decade has seen significant advances in robotics and artificial intelligence leading to an irrational exuberance in technology. I will discuss the challenges of realizing autonomous flight in environments with obstacles in the absence of GPS. I will describe our approaches to state estimation and designing perception-action loops for high speed navigation with applications to precision agriculture and first response. Finally, I will discuss some of limitations with current approaches in the field and challenges in robotics and autonomy. 
    Dahlia Malkhi
    VMWare Research
    Title: BFT in the lens of Blockchains and Blockchains in the lens of BFT
    Date: October 9, 2018
    Abstract: Blockchain is a Byzantine Fault Tolerant (BFT) replicated state machine, in which each state-update is by itself a Turing machine with bounded resources.  The core algorithm for achieving BFT in a Blockchain appears completely different from classical BFT algorithms:Recent advances in blockchain technology blur these boundaries. Namely, hybrid solutions such as Byzcoin, Bitcoin-NG, Hybrid Consensus, Casper and Solida, anchor off-chain BFT decisions inside a PoW chain or the other way around. This talk keynote will describe Blockchain in the lens of BFT and BFT in the lens of Blockchain, and provide common algorithmic foundations for both.
    Margo Seltzer
    University of British Columbia
    Talk Title: Automatically Scalable Computation
    Date: November 6, 2018
    Abstract:As our computational infrastructure races gracefully forward into increasingly parallel multi-core and clustered systems, our ability to easily produce software that can successfully exploit such systems continues to stumble. For years, we’ve fantasized about the world in which we’d write simple, sequential programs, add magic sauce, and suddenly have scalable, parallel executions. We’re not there. We’re not even close. I’ll present a radical, potentially crazy approach to automatic scalability, combining learning, prediction, and speculation. To date, we’ve achieved shockingly good scalability and reasonable speedup in limited domains, but the potential is tantalizingly enormous.
    Eva Tardos
    Cornell

    Title: Algorithms and algorithmic game theory
    Gödel Prize, Fulkerson Prize
    Date: April 2, 2019
    Avrim Blum
    Professor and Chief Academic Officer
    Toyota Technological Institute at Chicago
    Talk Title: TBD
    Date: April 16, 2019
    Abstract: TBD

     
  • Susan Davidson
    University of Pennsylvania
    Title: Why Data Citation is a Computational Problem
    Date: October 5, 2017
    Abstract: While principles and standards have been developed for data citation, they are unlikely to be used unless we can couple the process of extracting information with that of providing a citation for it. I will discuss the problem of automatically generating citations for data in a database given how the data was obtained (the query) as well as the content (the data), and show how the problem of generating a citation is related to two well-studied problems in databases: query rewriting using views and provenance.To download Dr. Davidson’s lecture poster, click here. To view the seminar video, click here.
    Shafi Goldwasser
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    Title: Pseudo Deterministic Algorithms and Proofs
    Date: Thursday, October 12, 2017
    Abstract: Pseudo-deterministic algorithms are a class of randomized search algorithms, which output a unique answer with high probability. Intuitively, they are indistinguishable from deterministic algorithms by an polynomial time observer of their input/output behavior. In this talk I will describe what is known about pseudo-deterministic algorithms in the sequential, sub-linear and parallel setting. To download Dr. Goldwasser’s lecture series poster, click here.
    Ian Foster
    University of Chicago
    Title: Computing Just What You Need: Online Data Analysis and Reduction of Extreme Scales
    Date: Tuesday, December 5, 2017
    Abstract: A growing disparity between supercomputer computation speeds and I/O rates makes it increasingly infeasible for applications to save all results for offline analysis. Instead, applications must analyze and reduce data online so as to output only those results needed to answer target scientific question(s).  To download Dr. Foster’s lecture series poster, click here. To view the seminar video, click here.
    Manuelo Veloso
    University of California, Berkeley

    Title: 
    Human-AI Interaction: Symbiotic Autonomy, Learning, and Transparency in Service Robots
    Date: Thursday, April 12, 2018
    Abstract: In this talk, I will first introduce our CoBot service robots and their novel localization and symbiotic autonomy, which enable them to consistently move in our buildings, and learn from asking humans or the web for help to overcome their limitations. I frame the research as human-AI interaction also including an interpretability approach by language generation to alert and respond to human explanation requests. I will conclude with a brief discussion of AI, machine learning, and robotics, and their potential social impact.
    To download Dr. Veloso’s lecture series poster, click here.

    Jeff Dean
    Google

    Title:
    The Deep Learning Revolution in Building Intelligent Computer Systems
    Date: Thursday, April 26, 2018

    Abstract:
    In this talk, I’ll highlight some of the design decisions we made in building TensorFlow, discuss research results produced within our group in areas such as computer vision, language understanding, translation, healthcare, and robotics, and describe ways in which these ideas have been applied to a variety of problems in Google’s products, usually in close collaboration with other teams. I will also touch on some exciting areas of research that we are currently pursuing within our group.
    To download Dean’s lecture series poster, click here. To view the seminar video, click here.

  • Mark D. Hill
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
    Title: 
    Computer Architecture 1975-2025
    Date: Thursday, November 8
    Abstract: This talk will explain how computer architects contribute to information technology that is transforming the world. It will present computer architecture basics and trends since the first microprocessor in the mid-1970s. It will then discuss how present challenges to Moore’s Law will open up new directions for computer systems, including architecture as infrastructure, energy first, impact of emerging technologies, and cross-layer opportunities. Reference: CCC “21st Century Computer Architecture.”To download Dr. Hill’s lecture poster, click here. To view the seminar video, click here.
      Jim Kurose
    Assistant Director

    National Science Foundation
    Directorate of Computer & Information Science & Engineering (CISE)
    Title: An Expanding and Expansive View of Computing
    Date: Thursday, November 17
    Abstract: Advances in computer and information science and engineering are providing unprecedented opportunities for research and education.  My talk will begin with an overview of CISE activities and programs at the National Science Foundation and include a discussion of current trends that are shaping the future of our discipline.  I will also discuss the opportunities as well as the challenges that lay ahead for our community and for CISE.To download Dr. Kurose’s lecture series poster, click here. To view the seminar video, click here.
      Ben Shneiderman
    University of Maryland, College Park
    Title: Interactive Visual Discovery in Event Analytics Electronic Health Records and Other Applications
    Date: Tuesday, March 7, 2017
    Abstract: Advances in computer and information science and engineering are providing unprecedented opportunities for research and education.  My talk will begin with an overview of CISE activities and programs at the National Science Foundation and include a discussion of current trends that are shaping the future of our discipline.  I will also discuss the opportunities as well as the challenges that lay ahead for our community and for CISE. To download Dr. Shneiderman’s lecture series poster, click here.
    Ruzena Bajcsy
    University of California, Berkeley

    Title: Development of Kinematic and Dynamic Models For Individual Using System Estimation and Identification Techniques
    Date: Tuesday, April 11, 2017
    Abstract: This talk will introduce a kinematic and dynamic framework for creating a representative model of an individual. Building on results from geometric robotics, a method for formulating a geometric dynamic identification model is derived.
    To download Dr. Bajcsy’s lecture series poster, click here. To view the seminar video, click here.
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