Calendar

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Mar
3
Tue
Yang Zhang, Carnegie Mellon University – “Knowledge Is Power: Sensing The Physical World Around Devices”
Mar 3 @ 10:45 am – 11:45 am

Location

Hackerman B-17

Abstract

Computers seventy years ago knew only what could be loaded into their memory, but today they can access an entire internet of information. This expansion of knowledge has made them indispensable tools and assistants. However, even today, computing devices know little about the physical world, especially the environment immediately around them due to a lack of perceptual capabilities. For this reason, they can tell you more about medieval literature and the traffic in Tokyo than the home in which they reside. This lack of perception limits how smart and useful they can be, especially in our everyday tasks that could be augmented with information and interactivity.

In this talk, I will present my research on sensing approaches that boost computer perception of the immediate physical world. Specifically, I have explored sensing technologies that allow one deployed sensor to cover a wide area for user activity and event recognition as well as sensing technologies that enable the manufacture of smarter everyday objects. Together, these sensing technologies allow computers to monitor the state, count, and intensity of activities, which in turn can enable higher-order applications such as personal informatics, accessibility, digital health, sustainability, and beyond.

Bio

Yang Zhang is a PhD candidate in the Human-Computer Interaction Institute at Carnegie Mellon University and is also a Qualcomm Innovation Fellow. His research lies in the technical aspects of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) with a focus on sensing technologies that enhance computing devices with knowledge of the physical world around them. His research has received 2 best paper and 4 honorable mention awards at top venues, and extensive media coverage from leading media outlets such as MIT Technology Review, Engadget, and The Wall Street Journal. As much of his research is highly applied, it has led to collaborations with industry partners, such as Facebook Reality Labs, Apple, and Microsoft Research. More information can be found on his website: https://yangzhang.dev.

Host

Chien-Ming Huang

Mar
5
Thu
CS Seminar – “TBD”
Mar 5 @ 10:45 am – 11:45 am

Location

Hackerman B-17

Host

Chien-Ming Huang

Mar
10
Tue
Rui Zhang, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill – “Towards Automated Security Validation for Hardware Designs”
Mar 10 @ 10:45 am – 11:45 am

Location

Hackerman B-17

Abstract

Hardware provides the foundation of trust for computer systems. Defects in hardware designs routinely cause vulnerabilities that are exploitable by malicious software and compromise the security of the entire system. While mature hardware validation tools exist, they were primarily designed for checking functional correctness. How to systematically detect security-critical defects remains an open and challenging question.

In this talk, I will present my research on developing formal methods and practical tools for automated hardware security validation. First, I will discuss how to validate a hardware design given some security properties. I will present Coppelia, which is an end-to-end tool that designs hardware-oriented backward symbolic execution to find violations and generate exploit programs. Second, I will discuss how to efficiently build security properties. I will introduce ​SCIFinder, a methodology that leverages known vulnerabilities to mine and learn security invariants. I will then describe Transys, which automatically translates security properties across similar or different generations of hardware designs. These solutions have been applied to open-source RISC-V and OR1k CPUs, and have detected both existing and new vulnerabilities. I will conclude my talk by describing future directions on further improving formal methods to validate the security of modern hardware.

Bio

Rui Zhang is a PhD candidate in the Computer Science Department at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her research interest lies in the areas of hardware security and formal methods, with a focus on developing automated systems and tools for detecting vulnerabilities and validating the security of hardware designs. Her research has been recognized with a best paper award nomination at MICRO and a candidate of Top Picks in Hardware and Embedded Security. She is an invited participant at the Rising Stars in EECS Workshop and the Rising Stars in Computer Architecture Workshop. She received her master’s degree from Columbia University in 2015 and her bachelor’s degree from Peking University in 2013.

Host

Xin Jin

Mar
12
Thu
Ravi Karkar, University of Washington – “Designing Personal Health Technologies”
Mar 12 @ 10:45 am – 11:45 am

Location

Hackerman B-17

Abstract

The ongoing boom in personal health technologies offers new potential to support people in collecting and interpreting data about their own health and well-being. However, there is a mismatch between what technology currently delivers (e.g., step counts, sleep scores) versus what people expect from it (i.e., personal health insights and recommendations). Current technologies fall short of their potential due to complex and interrelated challenges (e.g., in meeting personal needs, in data quality, in their integration into clinical practice). A holistic approach is therefore necessary, focusing on end-to-end design that understands the individual, their environments, and their contexts. My research focuses on human-centered approaches to collecting, interacting with, and using novel health data toward improving human well-being through personalized insights and recommendations. I explore this in two major thrusts of research: (1) I build specialized tools to enable people living with chronic conditions to better leverage their personal health data in understanding and managing their health; and (2) Through the process of creating and studying such tools, I systematize frameworks and design recommendations to assist future developers in designing personal health tools.

Bio

Ravi Karkar is a PhD Candidate at the University of Washington’s Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering. His research has been published in leading human-computer interaction and medical venues, including CHI, UbiComp, DIS, JAMIA, and JHIR, receiving two Best Paper Honorable Mention awards (CHI 2017, DIS 2018). The research has also garnered strong interest from clinicians, researchers, and startups seeking to incorporate it in their work and has contributed to a patent application and several successful grants (a UW Innovation Award, an NIH R01, an NIH R21). He has served on the program committees for Pervasive Health and Graphics Interface, and as a student coordinator for DUB (the University of Washington’s cross-campus initiative in human-computer interaction and design research and education).

Host

Chien-Ming Huang

Mar
24
Tue
Noah Stephens-Davidowitz – “TBD”
Mar 24 @ 10:45 am – 11:45 am

Location

Hackerman B-17

Host

Abhishek Jain

Mar
26
Thu
Aravind Machiry – “TBD”
Mar 26 @ 10:45 am – 11:45 am

Location

Hackerman B-17

Host

Avi Rubin

Mar
31
Tue
Adji Bousso Dieng, Columbia – “TBD”
Mar 31 @ 10:45 am – 11:45 am

Location

Hackerman B-17

Host

Ilya Shpitser

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