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Sep
22
Tue
IAA Speaker: Jeannette Wing, Columbia University, Columbia University – “Trustworthy AI”
Sep 22 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Location

Zoom: see link below in abstract

Abstract

https://jhuapl.zoomgov.com/j/1619432368?pwd=UkRNNFBKODVoYThRZEJpNVo4b1N2Zz09

Recent years have seen an astounding growth in deployment of AI systems in critical domains such as autonomous
vehicles, criminal justice, healthcare, hiring, housing, human resource management, law enforcement, and public
safety, where decisions taken by AI agents directly impact human lives. Consequently, there is an increasing
concern if these decisions can be trusted to be correct, reliable, fair, and safe, especially under adversarial
attacks. How then can we deliver on the promise of the benefits of AI but address these scenarios that have lifecritical consequences for people and society? In short, how can we achieve trustworthy AI? Under the umbrella
of trustworthy computing, there is a long-established framework employing formal methods and verification
techniques for ensuring trust properties like reliability, security, and privacy of traditional software and hardware
systems. Just as for trustworthy computing, formal verification could be an effective approach for building trust in
AI-based systems. However, the set of properties needs to be extended beyond reliability, security, and privacy to
include fairness, robustness, probabilistic accuracy under uncertainty, and other properties yet to be identified and
defined. Further, there is a need for new property specifications and verification techniques to handle new kinds of
artifacts, e.g., data distributions, probabilistic programs, and machine learning based models that may learn and
adapt automatically over time. This talk will pose a new research agenda, from a formal methods perspective, for us
to increase trust in AI systems.

Bio

BIO
Jeannette M. Wing is Avanessians Director of the Data Science Institute and Professor of Computer Science at Columbia University. From
2013 to 2017, she was a Corporate Vice President of Microsoft Research. She is Adjunct Professor of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon
where she twice served as the Head of the Computer Science Department and had been on the faculty since 1985. From 2007-2010 she
was the Assistant Director of the Computer and Information Science and Engineering Directorate at the National Science Foundation. She
received her S.B., S.M., and Ph.D. degrees in Computer Science, all from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Professor Wing’s general
research interests are in the areas of trustworthy computing, specification and verification, concurrent and distributed systems, programming
languages, and software engineering. Her current interests are in the foundations of security and privacy, with a new focus on trustworthy AI.
She was or is on the editorial board of twelve journals, including the Journal of the ACM and Communications of the ACM. Professor Wing is
known for her work on linearizability, behavioral subtyping, attack graphs, and privacy-compliance checkers. Her 2006 seminal essay, titled
Computational Thinking, is credited with helping to establish the centrality of computer science to problem-solving in fields where previously
it had not been embraced. She is currently a member of: the National Library of Medicine Blue Ribbon Panel; the Science, Engineering, and
Technology Advisory Committee for the American Academy for Arts and Sciences; the Board of Trustees for the Institute of Pure and Applied
Mathematics; the Advisory Board for the Association for Women in Mathematics; and the Alibaba DAMO Technical Advisory Board. She
has been chair and/or a member of many other academic, government, and industry advisory boards. She received the CRA Distinguished
Service Award in 2011 and the ACM Distinguished Service Award in 2014. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences,
American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), and the Institute of Electrical and
Electronic Engineers (IEEE).

Hosts

IAA and CS

Sep
24
Thu
CS Seminar Series: Jean Fan, Johns Hopkins University, Johns Hopkins University – “Computational analysis of cellular and subcellular spatial transcriptional heterogeneity.”
Sep 24 @ 10:45 am – 12:00 pm

Location

Zoom: https://wse.zoom.us/j/91072426599

Abstract

Recent technological advancements have enabled spatially-resolved transcriptomic measurements of hundreds to thousands of mRNA species with a throughput of hundreds to thousands of single cells per single day experiment. However, computational methods for statistical analysis capable of taking advantage of this new spatial dimension are still needed to connect transcriptional and spatial-contextual differences in single cells as well as identify putative subpopulations and patterns in their spatial organization from within a probabilistic framework. Here, we will demonstrate how we applied computational analysis of transcriptome-scale multiplexed error-robust FISH (MERFISH) data to identify RNA species enriched in different subcellular compartments, transcriptionally distinct cell states corresponding to different cell-cycle phases, and spatial patterning of transcriptionally distinct cells. We anticipate that such spatially resolved transcriptome profiling coupled with spatial computational analyses could help address a wide array of questions ranging from the regulation of gene expression in cells to the development of cell fate and organization in tissues.

Bio

I am an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. My lab is interested in understanding the molecular and spatial-contextual factors shaping cellular identity and heterogeneity, particularly in the context of cancer and how this heterogeneity impacts tumor progression, therapeutic resistance, and ultimately clinical prognosis. We develop new open-source computational software for analyzing single-cell multi-omic and imaging data that can be tailored and applied to diverse cancer types and biological systems. I was previously an NCI F99/K00 post-doctoral fellow in the lab of Dr. Xiaowei Zhuang at Harvard University. I received my PhD in Bioinformatics and Integrative Genomics at Harvard under the mentorship of Dr. Peter Kharchenko at the Department of Biomedical Informatics and in close collaboration with Dr. Catherine Wu at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

Host

Department of Computer Science

Oct
13
Tue
Gerald M. Masson Distinguished Lecture Series: Nick McKeown
Oct 13 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Nick McKeown
Kleiner Perkins, Mayfield, and Sequoia Capital Professor in the school of Engineering, Professor of Computer Science, Sanford University
Title: TBD

McKeown researches techniques to improve the Internet. Most of this work has focused on the architecture, design, analysis, and implementation of high-performance Internet switches and routers. More recently, his interests have broadened to include network architecture, backbone network design, congestion control; and how the Internet might be redesigned if we were to start with a clean slate.

Additional talk details coming soon.

Distinguished Lecturer: Nick McKeown, Distinguished Talk, Stanford University – “TBA”
Oct 13 @ 11:15 am – 12:30 pm

Location

Zoom: https://wse.zoom.us/j/98084605280

Abstract

TBA

Bio

McKeown researches techniques to improve the Internet. Most of this work has focused on the architecture, design, analysis, and implementation of high-performance Internet switches and routers. More recently, his interests have broadened to include network architecture, backbone network design, congestion control; and how the Internet might be redesigned if we were to start with a clean slate.

Host

Department of Computer Science

Oct
15
Thu
CS Seminar Series: Carlee Joe-Wong, Carnegie Mellon University, Carnegie Mellon University – “TBA”
Oct 15 @ 10:45 am – 12:00 pm

Location

Zoom link: TBA

Abstract

TBA

Bio

Carlee Joe-Wong is an Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. She received
her A.B., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees from Princeton University in 2011, 2013, and 2016, respectively. Dr. Joe-Wong’s
research is in optimizing networked systems, particularly on applying machine learning and pricing to data and computing networks. From 2013 to 2014, she was the Director of Advanced Research at DataMi, a startup she co-founded from her Ph.D. research on mobile
data pricing. She has received a few awards for her work, including the ARO Young Investigator Award in 2019, the NSF CAREER Award in 2018, and the INFORMS ISS Design Science Award in 2014.

Carlee will be available for a Q&A after her talk until 1 PM.

Host

Department of Computer Science

Oct
20
Tue
CS Seminar Series: Jeremias Sulam, Johns Hopkins University, Johns Hopkins University – “TBA”
Oct 20 @ 10:45 am – 12:00 pm

Location

Zoom

Abstract

TBA

Bio

TBA

Host

Department of Computer Science

Oct
27
Tue
Krasnopoler Lecture: Ed Catmull, Pixar Animation Studios and Pixar Animation and Disney Animation – “Q&A”
Oct 27 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Location

Zoom

Abstract

N/A

Bio

TBA

Host

Department of Computer Science

Nov
17
Tue
CS Seminar Series: Homa Alemzadeh, Johns Hopkins University – “Context-Aware Safety Monitoring in Medical Cyber-Physical Systems”
Nov 17 @ 10:45 am – 12:00 pm

Location

Zoom

Bio

Homa Alemzadeh is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering with a courtesy appointment in Computer Science at the University of Virginia. She is also a member of the Link Lab, a multi-disciplinary center for research and education in Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS). Before joining UVA, she was a research staff member at the IBM T. J. Watson Research Center. Homa received her Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and her B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in Computer Engineering from the University of Tehran. Her research interests are at the intersection of computer systems dependability and data science, in particular data-driven resilience assessment and design of CPS with applications to medical devices, surgical robots, and autonomous systems. She is the recipient of the 2017 William C. Carter Ph.D. Dissertation Award in Dependability from the IEEE TC and IFIP Working Group 10.4 on Dependable Computing and Fault Tolerance. Her work on the analysis of safety incidents in robotic surgery was selected as the Maxwell Chamberlain Memorial Paper at the 50th annual meeting of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) and was featured in the Wall Street Journal, MIT Technology Review, and BBC, among others.

Host

Department of Computer Science

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